Articles Posted in Landlord - Tenant

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Leonard and Judith Peverieri and Peverieri Investments, LLC (landlords) appealed a trial court’s judgment confirming an arbitration award in favor of Couch Investments, LLC (tenant). Landlords argued that the arbitrator exceeded his powers when he found not only that landlords were liable for the cost of storm water drainage improvements required by the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), but also ordered remedies. Landlords argued on appeal that the trial court erred in denying their petition to vacate the arbitration award, and that the Court of Appeals erred in affirming the trial court’s judgment. After review, the Supreme Court affirmed the outcome, but on different grounds from the Court of Appeals. View "Couch Investments, LLC v. Peverieri" on Justia Law

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This case concerned a month-to-month tenancy pursuant to a written rental agreement. After the landlord gave the tenants a 30-day no-cause notice of termination of tenancy and the tenants failed to vacate the premises, the landlord filed an action for possession. The tenants filed an answer denying that the landlord was entitled to possession and alleging that the landlord had given notice of termination because of the tenants' legitimate complaints. The trial court rejected the tenants' defense and made written Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law. On appeal, the Supreme Court concluded that to prove retaliation under ORS 90.385, a tenant must establish that the landlord served the notice of termination because of the tenant's complaint. The tenant need not prove, in addition, that the complaint caused the landlord actual or perceived injury or that the landlord intended to cause the tenant equivalent injury in return. The Court reversed the appellate court's decision and the judgment of the circuit court, and remanded the case to the circuit court for further proceedings.View "Elk Creek Management Co. v. Gilbert" on Justia Law

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ORS 105.135(3) requires a plaintiff in an action for forcible entry and detainer (FED) to serve the summons and complaint "by the end of the judicial day next following the payment of filing fees." The issue in this case was whether failure to serve a summons and amended complaint within one day of the payment of filing fees required dismissal of the FED action. Both the trial court and the Court of Appeals concluded that such a failure did not require dismissal. Plaintiff Balboa Apartments filed an FED complaint against Defendant Lisa Patrick for nonpayment of residential rent. Plaintiff paid the requisite filing fee at the same time. The summons and complaint erroneously listed Defendant's apartment as unit "#20," when, in fact, defendant occupied unit "#28." A process server attempted service on the wrong apartment, ultimately posting a copy of the summons and complaint on the door of unit 20. Plaintiff learned of the mistake and filed an amended complaint that listed the correct unit number. Plaintiff did not pay an additional filing fee, because none was required. The clerk reset the first appearance date. A process server posted the amended complaint and summons at Defendant's apartment. Defendant petitioned for review, and the Supreme Court accepted review to determine whether the Court of Appeals accurately interpreted ORS 105.135. Upon review, the Supreme Court agreed with the trial and appellate courts which held dismissal of the case due to the gap in filing and payment of the filing fee was not warranted. View "Balboa Apartments v. Patrick" on Justia Law